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Calling all seasonal foodservice workers for opinions/advice

Hello all,

 

It has been a while since I posted on here, I tend to quietly sit on the side lines. But I was wanting to get some advice from some people that are both seasonal workers regularly as well as those that worked in restaurants when doing so.

 

This summer I will be returning to a place in Cape Cod Mass that I went last year (not on Coolworks). I am returning as a Line cook again and I am just starting to look ahead.

 

So, I was wondering, in the seasonal world how do you make the transition from Line Cook to Sous or Sous to Exec? Do you do it between jobs? Or do you return to a previous employer and they promote you? I have just noticed over the years that basically every supervisory position list supervisory experience as a requirement so its like a bubble that cant be broken. :)

Anyway, you get the general gist of the idea here. I know that in the "traditional" setting most tend to stay at a place til a spot of sous presents itself. BUT, we are not the most trditional groupare we?

 

Anyway, any and all advice and opinions welcome.

 

PS I have several years experience as a cook as well as a degree of that makes any difference.

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Taking the next step in brigade is not always the easiest on one’s self.  But it in the end the reward is worth it. And from what I have seen within the seasonal world, it is much easier to move up that ladder. I myself took helm as an Executive Chef at the age of 28. It had been a very long road to reach that, and now four years later it is not any easier. I feel I have to prove myself more, some of my staff is older and well I am the young buck at the helm.

 

Here is how I worked my way up.

 

Dishwasher

Prep Cook

Grande Manger

Fry Cook

Grill Cook

Lead Line

Special’s Chef

Executive Chef

Total time in a professional kitchen fifth teen years.

 

And how you mentioned, most are promoted from within, someone leaves and one moves up the ladder. Well it can work the same in the seasonal world. Most big city cooks/chefs can not handle the seasonal kitchen. I myself now have found that I prefer very remote locales compared to the big city.

 

If you have been with the same company for a few seasons and do not getting moved up, well it may be time to look for something new. And when you do start looking and talking with a new Chef, ask him flat out what are the chances for me moving up and taking on more task. The world of a kitchen is not easy and sometimes you just have to make it happen.

 

I hear ya, I too am aiming to be an exec right around the same as you and be a young buck. Currently I tend to walk in as a grill cook or equal position (broiler where I am going).

 

Most places have no problem giving me more responsibility when i ask for it and so on but I cant seem to move past the "goto Line cook" which is good in its own of course but doesnt offer me the ladder advancement I am aiming for.

 

Thanks for the advice as always Franklin. i'll be sure to ask about the room for advancement this winter.

 

As far as what I prefer, I have not yet experienced any remote locales. Any you would recommend for someone looking to learn snow sports in the winter?

 

In the winter I aim for some where warm. I think I am going to visit a few of my old cooks in Bali?

 

 

But Colorado, there a lot of ski resorts. Vail is a huge company there and they post jobs here on coolworks.

 

 

On the Bali note, how hard is it to get a seasonal job in a different country? Like Indonesia, New Zealand, or Australia?
How old are you?
I  am 22 and will be 23 right before Winter season (September)

http://boards.bootsnall.com/american-working-in-australia-t15292.html

 

Boot in all is a good site to find info. Be under 25 is great and under 30 in some cases. And if you are still in school it is easy to find a gig there and get a visa. I had a friend that spent his off time working in NZ.

 

Also one great thing you have is the schooling, it pays off in the end. And you are doing the right thing gaining your exp to go with it.

Yea for sure, I also am one class away from a certificate in "Hotel Restaurant Management" That i may take online over the summer :) I figure that will prove I am at least knowledgable in management even if not experienced.

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